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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   May 2014
The Wachter Chloroform Dropper
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   May 2014
The Wachter Chloroform Dropper
Anesthesiology 05 2014, Vol.120, 1117. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000446484.65389.e8
Anesthesiology 05 2014, Vol.120, 1117. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000446484.65389.e8
An American citizen residing in Jersey City, New Jersey, Frederick Wachter filed on Columbus Day of 1905 for a U.S. patent on his “Chloroform-Dropper.” On the right side of both images, an air-venting tube h extends down through the stopper and deep inside the drop bottle as tube p. A central screw turns through 90 degrees from s[hut] to o[pen]. When fully open, with bent tubes pointed downward, chloroform can pass through the left tubing on both images, from e to f. Granted on June 12, 1906, [U.S.] “PAT No 823233” was inscribed across the dropper top. One of the few examples of dropper bottle technology not designed in Europe, the Wachter Chloroform Dropper was designed, as Europeans will gleefully note, by a German-American who was born in Baden, Germany. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
An American citizen residing in Jersey City, New Jersey, Frederick Wachter filed on Columbus Day of 1905 for a U.S. patent on his “Chloroform-Dropper.” On the right side of both images, an air-venting tube h extends down through the stopper and deep inside the drop bottle as tube p. A central screw turns through 90 degrees from s[hut] to o[pen]. When fully open, with bent tubes pointed downward, chloroform can pass through the left tubing on both images, from e to f. Granted on June 12, 1906, [U.S.] “PAT No 823233” was inscribed across the dropper top. One of the few examples of dropper bottle technology not designed in Europe, the Wachter Chloroform Dropper was designed, as Europeans will gleefully note, by a German-American who was born in Baden, Germany. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
An American citizen residing in Jersey City, New Jersey, Frederick Wachter filed on Columbus Day of 1905 for a U.S. patent on his “Chloroform-Dropper.” On the right side of both images, an air-venting tube h extends down through the stopper and deep inside the drop bottle as tube p. A central screw turns through 90 degrees from s[hut] to o[pen]. When fully open, with bent tubes pointed downward, chloroform can pass through the left tubing on both images, from e to f. Granted on June 12, 1906, [U.S.] “PAT No 823233” was inscribed across the dropper top. One of the few examples of dropper bottle technology not designed in Europe, the Wachter Chloroform Dropper was designed, as Europeans will gleefully note, by a German-American who was born in Baden, Germany. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Park Ridge, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
An American citizen residing in Jersey City, New Jersey, Frederick Wachter filed on Columbus Day of 1905 for a U.S. patent on his “Chloroform-Dropper.” On the right side of both images, an air-venting tube h extends down through the stopper and deep inside the drop bottle as tube p. A central screw turns through 90 degrees from s[hut] to o[pen]. When fully open, with bent tubes pointed downward, chloroform can pass through the left tubing on both images, from e to f. Granted on June 12, 1906, [U.S.] “PAT No 823233” was inscribed across the dropper top. One of the few examples of dropper bottle technology not designed in Europe, the Wachter Chloroform Dropper was designed, as Europeans will gleefully note, by a German-American who was born in Baden, Germany. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
An American citizen residing in Jersey City, New Jersey, Frederick Wachter filed on Columbus Day of 1905 for a U.S. patent on his “Chloroform-Dropper.” On the right side of both images, an air-venting tube h extends down through the stopper and deep inside the drop bottle as tube p. A central screw turns through 90 degrees from s[hut] to o[pen]. When fully open, with bent tubes pointed downward, chloroform can pass through the left tubing on both images, from e to f. Granted on June 12, 1906, [U.S.] “PAT No 823233” was inscribed across the dropper top. One of the few examples of dropper bottle technology not designed in Europe, the Wachter Chloroform Dropper was designed, as Europeans will gleefully note, by a German-American who was born in Baden, Germany. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
An American citizen residing in Jersey City, New Jersey, Frederick Wachter filed on Columbus Day of 1905 for a U.S. patent on his “Chloroform-Dropper.” On the right side of both images, an air-venting tube h extends down through the stopper and deep inside the drop bottle as tube p. A central screw turns through 90 degrees from s[hut] to o[pen]. When fully open, with bent tubes pointed downward, chloroform can pass through the left tubing on both images, from e to f. Granted on June 12, 1906, [U.S.] “PAT No 823233” was inscribed across the dropper top. One of the few examples of dropper bottle technology not designed in Europe, the Wachter Chloroform Dropper was designed, as Europeans will gleefully note, by a German-American who was born in Baden, Germany. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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