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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   May 2014
A.L. Parker’s Broadside: “Any… Painless” Anesthetic for Penacook
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   May 2014
A.L. Parker’s Broadside: “Any… Painless” Anesthetic for Penacook
Anesthesiology 05 2014, Vol.120, 1077. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000446483.65389.26
Anesthesiology 05 2014, Vol.120, 1077. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000446483.65389.26
Arthur Linwood Parker, D.D.S. (1868–1917), directed this side of his Littleton/Penacook broadsheet at Penacook (right). For sophisticated villagers who lived there, outside New Hampshire’s capital city of Concord, Parker cited the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery as his dental alma mater. Knowing that Penacookians expected more anesthetic choices than simply laughing gas, he advertised (left) that “Any of the Reliable Methods [are] Used for the Painless Extraction of Teeth.” Having lost his first wife in Penacook, Parker had remarried in 1903. However, his personal and professional happiness were soon overtaken by a second tragedy. Parkinson’s disease forced him out of dentistry by 1910 and eventually killed him 7 years later. This broadsheet is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Arthur Linwood Parker, D.D.S. (1868–1917), directed this side of his Littleton/Penacook broadsheet at Penacook (right). For sophisticated villagers who lived there, outside New Hampshire’s capital city of Concord, Parker cited the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery as his dental alma mater. Knowing that Penacookians expected more anesthetic choices than simply laughing gas, he advertised (left) that “Any of the Reliable Methods [are] Used for the Painless Extraction of Teeth.” Having lost his first wife in Penacook, Parker had remarried in 1903. However, his personal and professional happiness were soon overtaken by a second tragedy. Parkinson’s disease forced him out of dentistry by 1910 and eventually killed him 7 years later. This broadsheet is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Arthur Linwood Parker, D.D.S. (1868–1917), directed this side of his Littleton/Penacook broadsheet at Penacook (right). For sophisticated villagers who lived there, outside New Hampshire’s capital city of Concord, Parker cited the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery as his dental alma mater. Knowing that Penacookians expected more anesthetic choices than simply laughing gas, he advertised (left) that “Any of the Reliable Methods [are] Used for the Painless Extraction of Teeth.” Having lost his first wife in Penacook, Parker had remarried in 1903. However, his personal and professional happiness were soon overtaken by a second tragedy. Parkinson’s disease forced him out of dentistry by 1910 and eventually killed him 7 years later. This broadsheet is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Park Ridge, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Arthur Linwood Parker, D.D.S. (1868–1917), directed this side of his Littleton/Penacook broadsheet at Penacook (right). For sophisticated villagers who lived there, outside New Hampshire’s capital city of Concord, Parker cited the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery as his dental alma mater. Knowing that Penacookians expected more anesthetic choices than simply laughing gas, he advertised (left) that “Any of the Reliable Methods [are] Used for the Painless Extraction of Teeth.” Having lost his first wife in Penacook, Parker had remarried in 1903. However, his personal and professional happiness were soon overtaken by a second tragedy. Parkinson’s disease forced him out of dentistry by 1910 and eventually killed him 7 years later. This broadsheet is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Arthur Linwood Parker, D.D.S. (1868–1917), directed this side of his Littleton/Penacook broadsheet at Penacook (right). For sophisticated villagers who lived there, outside New Hampshire’s capital city of Concord, Parker cited the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery as his dental alma mater. Knowing that Penacookians expected more anesthetic choices than simply laughing gas, he advertised (left) that “Any of the Reliable Methods [are] Used for the Painless Extraction of Teeth.” Having lost his first wife in Penacook, Parker had remarried in 1903. However, his personal and professional happiness were soon overtaken by a second tragedy. Parkinson’s disease forced him out of dentistry by 1910 and eventually killed him 7 years later. This broadsheet is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Arthur Linwood Parker, D.D.S. (1868–1917), directed this side of his Littleton/Penacook broadsheet at Penacook (right). For sophisticated villagers who lived there, outside New Hampshire’s capital city of Concord, Parker cited the Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery as his dental alma mater. Knowing that Penacookians expected more anesthetic choices than simply laughing gas, he advertised (left) that “Any of the Reliable Methods [are] Used for the Painless Extraction of Teeth.” Having lost his first wife in Penacook, Parker had remarried in 1903. However, his personal and professional happiness were soon overtaken by a second tragedy. Parkinson’s disease forced him out of dentistry by 1910 and eventually killed him 7 years later. This broadsheet is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Ben Z. Swanson Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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