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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   July 2014
“Hands-On” Teaching by Chevalier Jackson
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   July 2014
“Hands-On” Teaching by Chevalier Jackson
Anesthesiology 07 2014, Vol.121, 139. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000450456.25495.4a
Anesthesiology 07 2014, Vol.121, 139. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000450456.25495.4a
Nearly 40 years after inventing his namesake “U-shaped” laryngoscope, Chevalier Jackson, M.D. (1865–1958) emerged from clinical retirement to teach “broncho-esophagology” during World War II to postgraduates at Temple University in Philadelphia. The ambidextrous “Chev” Jackson would turn his back to the class and, with chalk sticks in both hands, simultaneously draw out the left and right halves of any teaching diagrams on the blackboard or on poster paper. He accomplished a similar two-handed feat in 1943 by creating this pastel (left) of the upper airway and the bronchial branches. Since Dr. Jackson could sign his name with either hand or simultaneously, from opposite ends of his signature, with both hands, please inspect his autograph on this piece (right) and decide for yourself: did Dr. Jackson use one hand or two? This pastel is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Nicholas Samponaro Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Nearly 40 years after inventing his namesake “U-shaped” laryngoscope, Chevalier Jackson, M.D. (1865–1958) emerged from clinical retirement to teach “broncho-esophagology” during World War II to postgraduates at Temple University in Philadelphia. The ambidextrous “Chev” Jackson would turn his back to the class and, with chalk sticks in both hands, simultaneously draw out the left and right halves of any teaching diagrams on the blackboard or on poster paper. He accomplished a similar two-handed feat in 1943 by creating this pastel (left) of the upper airway and the bronchial branches. Since Dr. Jackson could sign his name with either hand or simultaneously, from opposite ends of his signature, with both hands, please inspect his autograph on this piece (right) and decide for yourself: did Dr. Jackson use one hand or two? This pastel is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Nicholas Samponaro Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Nearly 40 years after inventing his namesake “U-shaped” laryngoscope, Chevalier Jackson, M.D. (1865–1958) emerged from clinical retirement to teach “broncho-esophagology” during World War II to postgraduates at Temple University in Philadelphia. The ambidextrous “Chev” Jackson would turn his back to the class and, with chalk sticks in both hands, simultaneously draw out the left and right halves of any teaching diagrams on the blackboard or on poster paper. He accomplished a similar two-handed feat in 1943 by creating this pastel (left) of the upper airway and the bronchial branches. Since Dr. Jackson could sign his name with either hand or simultaneously, from opposite ends of his signature, with both hands, please inspect his autograph on this piece (right) and decide for yourself: did Dr. Jackson use one hand or two? This pastel is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Nicholas Samponaro Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Park Ridge, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Nearly 40 years after inventing his namesake “U-shaped” laryngoscope, Chevalier Jackson, M.D. (1865–1958) emerged from clinical retirement to teach “broncho-esophagology” during World War II to postgraduates at Temple University in Philadelphia. The ambidextrous “Chev” Jackson would turn his back to the class and, with chalk sticks in both hands, simultaneously draw out the left and right halves of any teaching diagrams on the blackboard or on poster paper. He accomplished a similar two-handed feat in 1943 by creating this pastel (left) of the upper airway and the bronchial branches. Since Dr. Jackson could sign his name with either hand or simultaneously, from opposite ends of his signature, with both hands, please inspect his autograph on this piece (right) and decide for yourself: did Dr. Jackson use one hand or two? This pastel is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Nicholas Samponaro Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Nearly 40 years after inventing his namesake “U-shaped” laryngoscope, Chevalier Jackson, M.D. (1865–1958) emerged from clinical retirement to teach “broncho-esophagology” during World War II to postgraduates at Temple University in Philadelphia. The ambidextrous “Chev” Jackson would turn his back to the class and, with chalk sticks in both hands, simultaneously draw out the left and right halves of any teaching diagrams on the blackboard or on poster paper. He accomplished a similar two-handed feat in 1943 by creating this pastel (left) of the upper airway and the bronchial branches. Since Dr. Jackson could sign his name with either hand or simultaneously, from opposite ends of his signature, with both hands, please inspect his autograph on this piece (right) and decide for yourself: did Dr. Jackson use one hand or two? This pastel is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Nicholas Samponaro Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Nearly 40 years after inventing his namesake “U-shaped” laryngoscope, Chevalier Jackson, M.D. (1865–1958) emerged from clinical retirement to teach “broncho-esophagology” during World War II to postgraduates at Temple University in Philadelphia. The ambidextrous “Chev” Jackson would turn his back to the class and, with chalk sticks in both hands, simultaneously draw out the left and right halves of any teaching diagrams on the blackboard or on poster paper. He accomplished a similar two-handed feat in 1943 by creating this pastel (left) of the upper airway and the bronchial branches. Since Dr. Jackson could sign his name with either hand or simultaneously, from opposite ends of his signature, with both hands, please inspect his autograph on this piece (right) and decide for yourself: did Dr. Jackson use one hand or two? This pastel is part of the Wood Library-Museum’s Nicholas Samponaro Collection. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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