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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   August 2014
Holy Moly: Hermes’ Anticholinesterase Antidote
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   August 2014
Holy Moly: Hermes’ Anticholinesterase Antidote
Anesthesiology 08 2014, Vol.121, 371. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000451816.76346.cd
Anesthesiology 08 2014, Vol.121, 371. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000451816.76346.cd
Above the double-flowering sweet violets (ca.1870, right), W. H. Prestele depicted Snowdrops from the genus Galanthus of winter/spring blooming plants with dark roots and down-facing white flowers. Snowdrops were linked (1722) by British poet Thomas Tickell to the herb Moly that wing-helmeted Hermes (left, A. Carracci’s ca.1590 Mercury Protecting Ulysses from the Charms of Circe) gave Odysseus (Ulysses) to counteract the potion of the witch-goddess Circe. Plaitakis and Duvoisin (1983) have suggested that the Snowdrop’s anticholinesterase inhibitor, galant(h)amine, could be apotropaic (warding off evil) against the tropane alkaloidal effects of Circe’s anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Above the double-flowering sweet violets (ca.1870, right), W. H. Prestele depicted Snowdrops from the genus Galanthus of winter/spring blooming plants with dark roots and down-facing white flowers. Snowdrops were linked (1722) by British poet Thomas Tickell to the herb Moly that wing-helmeted Hermes (left, A. Carracci’s ca.1590 Mercury Protecting Ulysses from the Charms of Circe) gave Odysseus (Ulysses) to counteract the potion of the witch-goddess Circe. Plaitakis and Duvoisin (1983) have suggested that the Snowdrop’s anticholinesterase inhibitor, galant(h)amine, could be apotropaic (warding off evil) against the tropane alkaloidal effects of Circe’s anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Above the double-flowering sweet violets (ca.1870, right), W. H. Prestele depicted Snowdrops from the genus Galanthus of winter/spring blooming plants with dark roots and down-facing white flowers. Snowdrops were linked (1722) by British poet Thomas Tickell to the herb Moly that wing-helmeted Hermes (left, A. Carracci’s ca.1590 Mercury Protecting Ulysses from the Charms of Circe) gave Odysseus (Ulysses) to counteract the potion of the witch-goddess Circe. Plaitakis and Duvoisin (1983) have suggested that the Snowdrop’s anticholinesterase inhibitor, galant(h)amine, could be apotropaic (warding off evil) against the tropane alkaloidal effects of Circe’s anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
Above the double-flowering sweet violets (ca.1870, right), W. H. Prestele depicted Snowdrops from the genus Galanthus of winter/spring blooming plants with dark roots and down-facing white flowers. Snowdrops were linked (1722) by British poet Thomas Tickell to the herb Moly that wing-helmeted Hermes (left, A. Carracci’s ca.1590 Mercury Protecting Ulysses from the Charms of Circe) gave Odysseus (Ulysses) to counteract the potion of the witch-goddess Circe. Plaitakis and Duvoisin (1983) have suggested that the Snowdrop’s anticholinesterase inhibitor, galant(h)amine, could be apotropaic (warding off evil) against the tropane alkaloidal effects of Circe’s anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Above the double-flowering sweet violets (ca.1870, right), W. H. Prestele depicted Snowdrops from the genus Galanthus of winter/spring blooming plants with dark roots and down-facing white flowers. Snowdrops were linked (1722) by British poet Thomas Tickell to the herb Moly that wing-helmeted Hermes (left, A. Carracci’s ca.1590 Mercury Protecting Ulysses from the Charms of Circe) gave Odysseus (Ulysses) to counteract the potion of the witch-goddess Circe. Plaitakis and Duvoisin (1983) have suggested that the Snowdrop’s anticholinesterase inhibitor, galant(h)amine, could be apotropaic (warding off evil) against the tropane alkaloidal effects of Circe’s anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
Above the double-flowering sweet violets (ca.1870, right), W. H. Prestele depicted Snowdrops from the genus Galanthus of winter/spring blooming plants with dark roots and down-facing white flowers. Snowdrops were linked (1722) by British poet Thomas Tickell to the herb Moly that wing-helmeted Hermes (left, A. Carracci’s ca.1590 Mercury Protecting Ulysses from the Charms of Circe) gave Odysseus (Ulysses) to counteract the potion of the witch-goddess Circe. Plaitakis and Duvoisin (1983) have suggested that the Snowdrop’s anticholinesterase inhibitor, galant(h)amine, could be apotropaic (warding off evil) against the tropane alkaloidal effects of Circe’s anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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