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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum  |   August 2014
Wine before Swine: Circe’s Anticholinergic Potion
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Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum
Anesthesiology Reflections from the Wood Library-Museum   |   August 2014
Wine before Swine: Circe’s Anticholinergic Potion
Anesthesiology 08 2014, Vol.121, 259. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000451815.94272.4a
Anesthesiology 08 2014, Vol.121, 259. doi:10.1097/01.anes.0000451815.94272.4a
England’s Anne Pratt depicted (ca.1860, right) the intoxicating beauty of the Nightshades Family, or Solanaceae, such as (1) Thornapple (Datura), and the (2) Stinking (henbane), (3) Woody (bittersweet), (4) Black (common), and (5) Deadly (belladonna) Nightshades. One or more plants like these and/or Mandrake (Mandragora) likely supplied deliriant anticholinergics for the wine-laced potion that J. M. Waterhouse painted (1891, left) witch-goddess Circe feeding to the shipmates of Odysseus (Ulysses). In high doses, such tropane alkaloidal mixtures of hyoscyamine, scopolamine, and atropine can kill; in low doses, these deliriants can induce hallucinations of flying or of transforming into animals. According to Homer’s Odyssey, each drugged sailor (believed that he) was transformed into a pig (left, at Circe’s feet) by the witch-goddess’ anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
England’s Anne Pratt depicted (ca.1860, right) the intoxicating beauty of the Nightshades Family, or Solanaceae, such as (1) Thornapple (Datura), and the (2) Stinking (henbane), (3) Woody (bittersweet), (4) Black (common), and (5) Deadly (belladonna) Nightshades. One or more plants like these and/or Mandrake (Mandragora) likely supplied deliriant anticholinergics for the wine-laced potion that J. M. Waterhouse painted (1891, left) witch-goddess Circe feeding to the shipmates of Odysseus (Ulysses). In high doses, such tropane alkaloidal mixtures of hyoscyamine, scopolamine, and atropine can kill; in low doses, these deliriants can induce hallucinations of flying or of transforming into animals. According to Homer’s Odyssey, each drugged sailor (believed that he) was transformed into a pig (left, at Circe’s feet) by the witch-goddess’ anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
England’s Anne Pratt depicted (ca.1860, right) the intoxicating beauty of the Nightshades Family, or Solanaceae, such as (1) Thornapple (Datura), and the (2) Stinking (henbane), (3) Woody (bittersweet), (4) Black (common), and (5) Deadly (belladonna) Nightshades. One or more plants like these and/or Mandrake (Mandragora) likely supplied deliriant anticholinergics for the wine-laced potion that J. M. Waterhouse painted (1891, left) witch-goddess Circe feeding to the shipmates of Odysseus (Ulysses). In high doses, such tropane alkaloidal mixtures of hyoscyamine, scopolamine, and atropine can kill; in low doses, these deliriants can induce hallucinations of flying or of transforming into animals. According to Homer’s Odyssey, each drugged sailor (believed that he) was transformed into a pig (left, at Circe’s feet) by the witch-goddess’ anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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George S. Bause, M.D., M.P.H., Honorary Curator, ASA’s Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology, Schaumburg, Illinois, and Clinical Associate Professor, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio. UJYC@aol.com.
England’s Anne Pratt depicted (ca.1860, right) the intoxicating beauty of the Nightshades Family, or Solanaceae, such as (1) Thornapple (Datura), and the (2) Stinking (henbane), (3) Woody (bittersweet), (4) Black (common), and (5) Deadly (belladonna) Nightshades. One or more plants like these and/or Mandrake (Mandragora) likely supplied deliriant anticholinergics for the wine-laced potion that J. M. Waterhouse painted (1891, left) witch-goddess Circe feeding to the shipmates of Odysseus (Ulysses). In high doses, such tropane alkaloidal mixtures of hyoscyamine, scopolamine, and atropine can kill; in low doses, these deliriants can induce hallucinations of flying or of transforming into animals. According to Homer’s Odyssey, each drugged sailor (believed that he) was transformed into a pig (left, at Circe’s feet) by the witch-goddess’ anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
England’s Anne Pratt depicted (ca.1860, right) the intoxicating beauty of the Nightshades Family, or Solanaceae, such as (1) Thornapple (Datura), and the (2) Stinking (henbane), (3) Woody (bittersweet), (4) Black (common), and (5) Deadly (belladonna) Nightshades. One or more plants like these and/or Mandrake (Mandragora) likely supplied deliriant anticholinergics for the wine-laced potion that J. M. Waterhouse painted (1891, left) witch-goddess Circe feeding to the shipmates of Odysseus (Ulysses). In high doses, such tropane alkaloidal mixtures of hyoscyamine, scopolamine, and atropine can kill; in low doses, these deliriants can induce hallucinations of flying or of transforming into animals. According to Homer’s Odyssey, each drugged sailor (believed that he) was transformed into a pig (left, at Circe’s feet) by the witch-goddess’ anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
England’s Anne Pratt depicted (ca.1860, right) the intoxicating beauty of the Nightshades Family, or Solanaceae, such as (1) Thornapple (Datura), and the (2) Stinking (henbane), (3) Woody (bittersweet), (4) Black (common), and (5) Deadly (belladonna) Nightshades. One or more plants like these and/or Mandrake (Mandragora) likely supplied deliriant anticholinergics for the wine-laced potion that J. M. Waterhouse painted (1891, left) witch-goddess Circe feeding to the shipmates of Odysseus (Ulysses). In high doses, such tropane alkaloidal mixtures of hyoscyamine, scopolamine, and atropine can kill; in low doses, these deliriants can induce hallucinations of flying or of transforming into animals. According to Homer’s Odyssey, each drugged sailor (believed that he) was transformed into a pig (left, at Circe’s feet) by the witch-goddess’ anticholinergic potion. (Copyright © the American Society of Anesthesiologists, Inc.)
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